special tricks and treats …

Tonight, a lot of creatures will visit your door.  Be open minded.

The child who is grabbing more than one piece of candy might have poor fine motor skills.  The child who takes forever to pick out one piece of candy might have motor planning issues.  The child who does not say “trick or treat” or “thank you” might be painfully shy, non-verbal, or selectively mute…. If you cannot understand their words, they may struggle with developmental apraxia of speech.  The child who looks disappointed when he sees your bowl might have a life-threatening allergy.  The child who isn’t wearing a costume at all might have SPD or autism.

Know that they are thankful in their hearts and minds.

Be kind, be patient, smile, pretend you understand. It’s everyone’s Halloween.

Make a parent feel good by making a big deal of their special child.

Here’s a great tip before you venture out with your little spook: (via)

Practice trick or treating with your child ahead of time at your own door.  Take your child to the Halloween section of a store and explain that people wear all kinds of costumes.  Talk about the kinds of scary or funny costumes you might see.  If you think your child might be afraid during trick or treating, try making a game of it (e.g. Let’s see how many witches we’ll see today). This will help keep your child’s mind off the scary faces.

And a HAPPY HALLOWEEN TO ALL Y’ALL!!!!!