Tag Archives: potassium

Rambutan…..rambu-what???

rambutan(source)

Native to Malaysia, this fruit is also grown in  Indonesia, the Philippines, and Australia.  This particular tree can grow to about 50 – 80 feet high, but it’s not the height that interests me….look at the fruit!  Have you ever seen anything like this before??

Rambutan is closely related to the lychee fruit (and I know you remember THIS post, she said sarcastically).  And here’s the weird part…there are three different kinds of rambutan (no, that isn’t the weird part, the next part is the weird part). 

There is the male fruit, the hermaphrodite functioning as males and the hermaphrodite functioning as females Wha???

To the peeps in southeast Asia, this little beauty is as normal as an apple is to us, or at least most of us.

2004:07:29 18:02:35

YepShe’s pretty hairy, isn’t she….or he?  The word rambut in Malay is ‘hairy’, which you can see on the spiky rind, but don’t worry…if you bit into one of these little jewels there would be no ouchie.  They are soft and harmless.

So what do we do with it and how the heck do we eat it:   You can purchase the rambutan in Asian/Chinese markets in the produce area.  And you want to look for ones with bright red skin, not so much orange or yellow.  And don’t purchase if you see they have ‘black’ hairs….in fact, don’t purchase anything in the produce section with black hair on it…..(insert gag here).

Health Benefits:  Rambutans are high in vitamin C, plus copper, manganese, and trace elements of many other nutrients such as potassium, calcium, and iron.

How do we get to the good part:  Make a cut through the skin with a sharp knife.  Note: If your rambutans are very ripe, they can also be twisted open between your hands, and the fruit simply pops out.  Next peel away the skin and either cut out the seed inside or pop it into your mouth and have fun spitting the seed out!  (they frown on this in the produce department so wait until you get home).

Here’s a beautiful and tropical fruit salad to enjoy! (via)

tropicalfruitsaladblog

Ingredients:

  • YIELD: 1 large bowl of fruit salad
  • 1+1/2 cups fresh papaya, cubed
  • 1 cup pineapple chunks, fresh or canned
  • 1 banana, sliced
  • 1 cup mango, cubed
  • 1 cup strawberries, sliced or cut into quarters
  • 1 cup other fruit, local OR exotic such as blueberries, melon, dragon fruit, lychees, longans, or rambutans
  • Garnish: starfruit slices
  • FRUIT SALAD DRESSING:
  • 1/4 cup coconut milk
  • 1 Tbsp. freshly-squeezed lime juice
  • 2 Tbsp. brown sugar OR palm sugar

Preparation:

  1. Stir fruit salad dressing ingredients together in a cup until sugar dissolves.  Set aside.
  2. Place all the fresh fruit in a mixing bowl.
  3. Pour the dressing over and toss well to mix.
  4. Pour or scoop the fruit salad into a serving bowl, or into a prepared pineapple boat (as pictured).  Garnish just before serving with a star fruit slice.

Star Fruit Tip: To keep starfruit from going brown after slicing, simply drizzle over some fresh lime or lemon juice.

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headache food…

When dealing with an aching head, it’s become so easy to pop some pills. If you’re trying to steer clear of pain relievers, some of the best help can come from the produce aisle. (from fitsugar.com)

Potato: After a night out, you may think that a plate of greasy fries is the way to go; forget the french fries and go for a baked potato instead. Foods high in potassium have proven to help alleviate bad headaches, and a baked potato with its skin offers up to a whopping 600 mg

Bananas: The dynamic duo of potassium and magnesium come to the rescue in one tasty piece of fruit. Magnesium’s calming effects are a huge help when trying to alleviate an achy head.

Watermelon: A lot of the time when dealing with a headache, chances are you may be dehydrated. A water-rich fruit like watermelon can give you a huge boost and also serves as a solid source of potassium and magnesium!

Pineapple: Fresh pineapple can also help soothe your headache woes. The natural enzyme bromelain has been linked for centuries as a form of natural pain relief. It also boasts anti-inflammatory properties that can help get your head right as well.

Cucumber: In the same vein as watermelon, cucumber can help cut dehydration out of the picture. Composed of 95 percent water, the highly hydrating cucumber is a perfect option for a fresh, headache-fighting snack.

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what the heck is moringa?

Glad you asked…..or maybe you didn’t’….. but humor me while I tell you what I dug up…

According to the book Lost Crops of Africa, volume II” by the National Research Council, moringa leaves contain seven times the vitamin C in oranges, four times the calcium in milk, four times the vitamin A in carrots, two times the protein in milk, three times the potassium in bananas and twice the amount of iron in spinach. Optima of Africa, Ltd., a group working with the tree in Tanzania, also points out that 25 g — or close to an ounce — of moringa leaf powder per day provides a child with 42 percent of his daily protein requirement, 125 percent of calcium, 61 percent of magnesium, 41 percent of potassium, 71 percent of iron, 272 percent of vitamin A and 22 percent of vitamin C. Various parts of the tree also contain the minerals zinc, manganese, phosphorus and copper. (via)
Now there’s a nutritional powerhouse!!
Turns out this little miracle tree can not only provide for you medicinally, but it can even purify your water! Virtually every part of the tree can be used!
Craaazy! 
Natural News says, “The immature pods are the most valued and widely used of all  the tree parts. The pods are extremely nutritious, containing all the essential  amino acids along with many vitamins and other nutrients. The immature pod can  be eaten raw or prepared like green peas or green beans, while the mature pods  are usually fried and possess a peanut-like flavor The thickened root is used as a substitute for horseradish  although this is now discouraged as it contains alkaloids, especially  moriginine, and a bacteriocide, spirochin, both of which can prove fatal  following ingestion. The leaves are eaten as greens, in salads,  in vegetable curries, as pickles and for seasoning. They can be pounded up and  used for scrubbing utensils and for cleaning walls. Leaves and young branches  are relished by livestock. The Bark can be used for tanning and  also yields a coarse fiber. The flowers, which must be cooked,  are eaten either mixed with other foods or fried in batter and have been shown  to be rich in potassium and calcium.”
So where the heck have I been?  Even Dr. Oz has been talking about it!!!  It’s practically a money tree….of nutrition!
Moringa Leaves are full of essential disease-preventing nutrients:
  • Vitamin A, which acts as a shield against eye disease, skin disease, heart ailments, diarrhea, and many other diseases.
  • Vitamin C, fighting a host of illnesses including colds and flu.
  • Calcium, which builds strong bones and teeth, and helps prevent osteoporosis.
  • Potassium, essential for the functioning of the brain and nerves.
  • Proteins, the basic building blocks of all our body cells.

And here’s something cool…..Trees for Life is helping to spread awareness of Moringa’s benefits, and helping people grow their own Moringa trees.   That is waaay cool!  Helping people help themselves!!

They are also encouraging scientific research on Moringa and its potential uses.  Your gift of Moringa trees can help hungry people lead healtier, happier lives.

Wanna try some Moringa in capsule form?  I just purchased some HERE.  You can choose from a tea, leaf powder or the capsule form.  Since I am a bit silly when it comes to something new, I decided on the capsule form.  I will keep you posted on my new super-powers to come!

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