turkey tail mushrooms…gobbling up cancer!

untitled Can it be?

Paul Stamets, founder, Fungi Perfecti; Advisor, Program of Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona Medical School, Tucson says YES! Paul has written six books on mushroom cultivation and has received the National Geographic Adventure Magazine’s Green-Novator and the Argosy Foundation’s E-chievement Awards.  His mother was diagnosed with Stage IV breast cancer which spread to her liver.  Sadly, her oncologist at the Swedish Breast Cancer Clinic at the University of Washington, said it was the 2nd worse case of breast cancer she had seen in her 20 years of practice.  Told she only had  3 to 6 months to live, the oncologist told both mother and son about an intriguing new study using Turkey Tail mushrooms to cure cancer.

WHAT HAPPENED?

Willingly and with nothing to lose, Stamets’ mother tried the mushrooms (along with the drug Ariceptin). And only seven months later, Paul declared, “As of February 2010, she was virtually cancer-free”.  (watch his talk on TedMed here)

CANCER FREE……….let that sink in for a moment……..

The doctors said it was the quickest and most complete recovery they had ever witnessed.

WHAT CAN IT DO?

This traditional Chinese mushroom helps cancer patients strengthen their immune systems during chemotherapy.    Once brewed as a tea for thousands of years (during the Ming Dynasty in the 15th century) by the Chinese, its health potential has never been fully measured in scientific trials…..until now.  And the best part? 

APPROVED BY THE FDA for clinical trial at the center of a $5.4 million collaboration between Bastyr, the University of Washington and others, and funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

“One of the things chemotherapy does is suppress the immune system, so our question is whether patients taking the extract can maintain healthier immune function,” says Masa Sasagawa, ND, a senior project manager at the Bastyr University Research Institute.

SO WHAT IS IT?

This super-abundant colorful mushroom grows on dead trees, logs, branches, and stumps. Turkey tail mushrooms are called bracket fungi, meaning that they form thin, leather-like and leaf-like structures in concentric circles. Rather than gills underneath, as in shiitake mushrooms, their undersides have tiny pores, which emit spores, placing them in the polypore family. These mushrooms grow throughout the world, practically wherever trees can be found. In fact, turkey tails are some of most common mushrooms found on wood on the planet. (via)

HOW WILL IT BE USED?

The FDA has approved a clinical trial for turkey tail extract, where they will allow patients with advanced prostate cancer to take it along with conventional chemotherapy. Another group of patients will be given chemotherapy with a placebo. Additionally, a seven-year study funded by the National Institutes of Health and reported in November 2010 found that the use of turkey tail mushroom significantly boosted immunity in women who had been treated for breast cancer. Researchers at the University of Minnesota and Bastyr University conducted the study in women with stages I-III breast cancer who had completed radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Results showed that immune function was enhanced in the women who took daily doses of turkey tail in pill form and that none of the subjects suffered any adverse effects. The actual product used in the study was Host Defense Turkey Tail from Fungi Perfecti. (via)

HOW CAN YOU TAKE IT?

Typical dosage is 2-3 grams, 3 times per day with food.  The dosage that was used by mycologist Paul Stamet’s mother to cure her cancer was 8 capsules a day.  Turkey Tail mushrooms can be kept for years without losing any of their medicinal potency.  Store them away from heat and light to extend their shelf live even further.  Consuming Turkey Tail mushrooms can benefit anybody, even those in good health. (via)

WHERE CAN I FIND IT?

While the fractionated “drug” version of turkey tail, known as PSK, is not legal to sell in the U.S., the pure turkey tail product used in the U.S. NIH breast cancer clinical study is widely available from Fungi Perfecti (www.fungi.com) under the label “Host Defense.” Since this turkey tail mycelium is presented in its unaltered form, it qualifies as a FDA approved “nutraceutical” ingredient. In this form, it can be advertised in the United States and Canada as a supplement to “support the immune system.” (via) Make sure that there is a certifying agency on the label. Most consumers are not aware that seeing “organic” on the label, within a trademark, does not mean the mushrooms are organic. This is a common deception, and a subject of great controversy within the organic food and dietary supplement industry.

 

Find more info here:

http://wildbranchmushrooms.com/turkey-tail

http://www.bastyr.edu/news/general-news/2012/11/fda-approves-bastyr-turkey-tail-trial-cancer-patients

http://www.naturalnews.com/042965_turkey_tail_mushroom_cancer_treatment_scientific_study.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-stamets/mushrooms-cancer_b_1560691.html

http://www.endalldisease.com/turkey-tail-mushrooms-cancer/

 

 

 

cancer? let’s start with prevention…

Main sites of metastases for some common cance...
Main sites of metastases for some common cancer types. Primary cancers are denoted by “…cancer” and their main metastasis sites are denoted by “…metastases”. List of included entries and references is found on main image page in Commons: (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cancer.  It’s here.  It doesn’t surface overnight, but is a long process that can take years to raise it’s ugly head.

Prevention is all about making sure we are eating as healthy as possible and staying away from cancer landmines.

Here are a few landmines that have the potential to make cancer cells grow and multiply:

  • SMOKING:  According to the National Cancer Institute, there are over 7000 chemicals in cigarette smoke with 250 being harmful.  Do you smoke? STOP.
  • ALCOHOL:  Excessive alcohol intake (more than 2 servings/day for men and 1 serving/day for women) has been linked to an increased risk of cancer of the breast, mouth, throat, esophagus, colon, rectum and liver.  Medical News Today says 15% of all breast cancer deaths may be linked to alcohol.  Drink AND smoke?  STOP.
  • RADIATION:  Not just limited to x-rays, microwaves and nuclear reactors, radiation is also the light that comes from the sun and the heat that comes off our bodies.  Leukemia, a type of cancer that is centered in bone marrow, is the most common radiation induced cancer.  Severe sunburns also increase the risk of developing cancer.  Still tanning? STOP.
  • HORMONES:  Some hormones help cancer to grow and spread, such as breast and prostate cancers.  The longer women are exposed to high levels of estrogen, the greater the risk of developing breast cancer.  Your physician can recommend a hormone receptor test to see if cancer cells are sensitive to hormones.

There are other factors that contribute to cancer such as processed and red meats, salty foods, or meats cooked at dangerously high temperatures.

REDUCE YOUR RISK OF CANCER

Mayo Clinic says try these 7 tips to reduce your risk of cancer!

  1. Don’t use tobacco

    Using any type of tobacco puts you on a collision course with cancer. Smoking has been linked to various types of cancer — including cancer of the lung, bladder, cervix and kidney. And chewing tobacco has been linked to cancer of the oral cavity and pancreas. Even if you don’t use tobacco, exposure to secondhand smoke might increase your risk of lung cancer.

  2. Eat a healthy diet

    Although making healthy selections at the grocery store and at mealtime can’t guarantee cancer prevention, it might help reduce your risk. Consider these guidelines:

    • Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. Base your diet on fruits, vegetables and other foods from plant sources — such as whole grains and beans.
    • Limit fat. Eat lighter and leaner by choosing fewer high-fat foods, particularly those from animal sources. High-fat diets tend to be higher in calories and might increase the risk of overweight or obesity — which can, in turn, increase cancer risk.
    • If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation. The risk of various types of cancer — including cancer of the breast, colon, lung, kidney and liver — increases with the amount of alcohol you drink and the length of time you’ve been drinking regularly.
  3. Maintain a healthy weight and be physically active

Maintaining a healthy weight might lower the risk of various types of cancer, including cancer of the breast, prostate, lung, colon and kidney.

Physical activity counts, too. In addition to helping you control your weight, physical activity on its own might lower the risk of breast cancer and colon cancer.

Adults who participate in any amount of physical activity gain some health benefits. But for substantial health benefits, strive to get at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic physical activity. You can also do a combination of moderate and vigorous activity. As a general goal, include at least 30 minutes of physical activity in your daily routine — and if you can do more, even better.

4.  Protect yourself from the sun

Skin cancer is one of the most common kinds of cancer — and one of the most preventable. Try these tips:

  • Avoid midday sun. Stay out of the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when the sun’s rays are strongest.
  • Stay in the shade. When you’re outdoors, stay in the shade as much as possible. Sunglasses and a broad-rimmed hat help, too.
  • Cover exposed areas. Wear tightly woven, loosefitting clothing that covers as much of your skin as possible. Opt for bright or dark colors, which reflect more ultraviolet radiation than pastels or bleached cotton.
  • Don’t skimp on sunscreen. Use generous amounts of sunscreen when you’re outdoors, and reapply often.
  • Avoid tanning beds and sunlamps. These are just as damaging as natural sunlight.

5.  Get immunized

Cancer prevention includes protection from certain viral infections. Talk to your doctor about immunization against:

  • Hepatitis B. Hepatitis B can increase the risk of developing liver cancer. The hepatitis B vaccine is recommended for certain high-risk adults — such as adults who are sexually active but not in a mutually monogamous relationship, people with sexually transmitted infections, intravenous drug users, men who have sex with men, and health care or public safety workers who might be exposed to infected blood or body fluids.

Human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a sexually transmitted virus that can lead to cervical and other genital cancers as well as squamous cell cancers of the head and neck. The HPV vaccine is available to both men and women age 26 or younger who didn’t have the vaccine as adolescents.

6.  Avoid risky behaviorsAnother effective cancer prevention tactic is to avoid risky behaviors that can lead to infections that, in turn, might increase the risk of cancer. For example:

  • Practice safe sex. Limit your number of sexual partners, and use a condom when you have sex. The more sexual partners you have in your lifetime, the more likely you are to contract a sexually transmitted infection — such as HIV or HPV. People who have HIV or AIDS have a higher risk of cancer of the anus, liver and lung. HPV is most often associated with cervical cancer, but it might also increase the risk of cancer of the anus, penis, throat, vulva and vagina.
  • Don’t share needles. Sharing needles with an infected drug user can lead to HIV, as well as hepatitis B and hepatitis C — which can increase the risk of liver cancer. If you’re concerned about drug abuse or addiction, seek professional help.

7.   Get regular medical care

Regular self-exams and screenings for various types of cancers — such as cancer of the skin, colon, prostate, cervix and breast — can increase your chances of discovering cancer early, when treatment is most likely to be successful. Ask your doctor about the best cancer screening schedule for you.

Take cancer prevention into your own hands, starting today. The rewards will last a lifetime.

source:  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cancer-prevention/CA00024/NSECTIONGROUP=2

mistletoe curing cancer? is it almost christmas??

mistletoe bunch

When you think of Mistletoe, do you think of cancer?  No?  Well, this might change your mind!

You can certainly find mistletoe in the United States, but it’s the species found in Europe that is being used in treatment for cancer, inflammatory conditions and AIDS.

Rudolph Steiner, an Austrian Swiss physician, first used this in 1920 and founded the Society for Cancer Research.  The leaves and  twigs are used when making this herbal extract,  but not the berries, so replace your centerpiece.

mistletoe

The mistletoe preparations are used to stimulate the immune system, kill cancer cells, and help to reduce tumor size.  It’s also been said to reduce the pain and side effects of chemotherapy in some cancer patients.

A typical course can last several months to a year.  The doses are increased according to the patient’s condition.  Usually given by injection, it can also be given orally depending on the particular cancer.

“Mistletoe extracts are promoted as a remedy for numerous types of cancer, including cancer of the cervix, ovaries, breast, stomach, colon, lung, and as a treatment for leukemia, sarcoma, and lymphoma.

Promoters also claim mistletoe can lower blood pressure, decrease heart rate, relax spasms, and relieve symptoms of arthritis and rheumatism. It is further claimed to have sedative effects and is promoted to relieve the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy”, says Cancer.org.

Bottom line:  Is this in your backyard?  No, but I was able to find a list of doctors that are currently using this form of treatment!

Sources:

http://www.cancure.org/iscador_mistletoe.htm

http://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatmentsandsideeffects/complementaryandalternativemedicine/herbsvitaminsandminerals/mistletoe

the fight…

Today is the beginning of October and Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  I know many friends right now that are going through cancer treatments but one friend in particular, Shannon, is learning to fight like a girl.

She has undergone chemotherapy, double mastectomy, hysterectomy, and reconstructive surgery…..PHEW!!  I am so very naive when it comes to all of the treatments and medicines and just cannot imagine her world.  All I have known to do is to pray.  And pray, I do.

Cancer is ugly.  It’s mean and it just won’t go away.

Ladies, please get your mammograms!  Stay up on all the new research and lets learn TO FIGHT LIKE A GIRL!

Good websites:

http://www.ihatcancer.org

http://www.fightlikeagirlonline.com

http://www.cancersucks.info

http://www.gotcancer.org     (this is the best website for t-shirts!  I like “my oncologist is my bff”

I LOVE YOU, SHANNON!!!